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IMMIGRATION PHYSICAL EXAM

Examen fisico de Inmigracion

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Who must submit Form I-693?


Most applicants filing for adjustment of status to become a lawful permanent resident must submit Form I-693 completed by a designated civil surgeon. Certain other applicants may also be required to submit Form I-693 completed by a civil surgeon.

2. What if I am a refugee and already completed an immigration medical examination abroad?


If you are now applying for adjustment of status under INA section 209 one year after your first admission as a refugee, then you only need to repeat the entire immigration medical examination if the panel physician found a Class A medical condition during your examination.
If the panel physician did not find a Class A medical condition and therefore, you do not need to repeat the full immigration medical examination, then you must still comply with the vaccination requirements. This means you only need to submit Part 10. Vaccination Record and Parts 1. - 5., and Part 7. of Form I-693. Contact your state or local refugee health coordinator to find out whether a state or local health department can complete Part 10. of Form I-693. The health department must also complete Part 7. of the benefit request.

3. What if I am a K nonimmigrant visa holder and already completed an immigration medical examination
abroad?

If you were admitted as a:


A. K-1 fiancé(e) or a K-2 child of a K-1 fiancé(e); or


B. K-3 spouse of a U.S. citizen or a K-4 child of a K-3 spouse of a U.S. citizen; and


C. You received a medical examination prior to admission, then:


(1) You are not required to complete another immigration medical examination as long as you file your Form
I-485 within one year of an immigration medical examination completed outside the United States; and


(a) The panel physician did not find a Class A medical condition during your imigration medical examination;
or

(b) The panel physician did find a Class A medical condition, you received a waiver of inadmissibility, and
you have complied with the terms and conditions of the waiver.


(2) Even if a new immigration medical examination is not required, you must still show proof that you complied
with the vaccination requirements. If the vaccination record (DS 3025) was not properly completed and
included as part of the original medical examination report completed abroad, you will need to have the Part


10. Vaccination Record completed by a designated civil surgeon. In this case, you must submit Parts 1. - 5.,
7., and 10. of Form I-693.

4. What if I am an asylee derivative applying for adjustment of status and already completed an immigration medical examination abroad?

If you were admitted to the United States as an asylee derivative, you generally do not need to repeat, at the time you
submit Form I-485, the entire immigration medical examination provided that:
A. The panel physician found no Class A medical condition during your immigration medical examination completed outside the United States; and


B. You are applying for adjustment of status within one year of becoming eligible to file.
You must, however, comply with the vaccination requirement and submit Part 10. Vaccination Record and Parts


1. - 5., and 7. of Form I-693 with your Form I-485.

5. What if I am an Afghan national who entered the United States under Operation Allies Welcome (OAW), am applying for adjustment of status, and already completed an immigration medical examination abroad?

If you are an Afghan national applying for adjustment of status who entered the United States under OAW, you do not
have to repeat the immigration medical examination by submitting Form I-693 if:
• The results of the immigration medical examination completed outside the United States by a panel physician are
in your A-File and do not report a Class A medical condition;
• The panel physician completed the immigration medical examination no more than 4 years before the date you
file to adjust status; and
• No evidence suggests that you have acquired a Class A medical condition after entry into the United States.

6. May any doctor perform the required immigration medical examination?

Only a doctor who was designated by USCIS as a civil surgeon may perform the medical examination (except for
limited exceptions for military and health department blanket designated civil surgeons). USCIS will not accept a
Form I-693 completed by a doctor who is not a currently designated civil surgeon.

7. How do I know if a doctor is a designated civil surgeon?

Doctors found through the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov or through the USCIS Contact Center are generally
current in their designation as civil surgeons. Applicants who are unsure should ask doctors to confirm their status as
a civil surgeon

8. Who pays for the immigration medical examination?

You, the applicant, must pay all costs of the immigration medical examination, including the cost of any follow-up
tests or treatment that is required. Make payments directly to the civil surgeon or other health care provider.

9. What are the health-related grounds of inadmissibility?

U.S. immigration law divides the health-related grounds of inadmissibility into the following four general categories:


A. Communicable diseases of public health significance;


B. Lack of proof of having received required vaccinations;


C. Physical or mental disorders with associated harmful behavior or a history of associated harmful behavior; and

D. Drug abuse or addiction.
See INA section 212(a)(1)(A). HHS regulations classify these and other medical conditions into class A or B medical conditions. Class A medical conditions result in inadmissibility while Class B medical conditions do not.

 

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